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20130104
20130112
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
board does, sharing high quality courses that are designed and built upon and refined through educators working together. >> i want to separate these four second. i could not agree with you more that brilliant minds helped shape a common core. as opposed to the construction -- >> it was a combination of mathematicians and educators. if you're making turf courses -- >> we have teacher preparation programs across the country. many of them not the kinds of institutions for which people are recruited. we're trying to get these programs to overhaul what they do. i understand the value of trying to share practices. i am curious. are there other ways to help change what is going on? >> let me pause and celebrate your candor in the following sense. this is the time in a time of limited resources to step out. when people ask what more resources to need to implement it worries me as a question in the sense that we have to learn how to redirect and be more efficient and to get an edge of the few things these standards are asking us to do. i am saying you're right. as a system, producing productive
transportation to education, to preserving the capabilities of our national guard. while each governor has his or her own unique circumstances, we all have to facilitate job growth, improve schools, and be financially responsible. as much as we do in our states, our economies are tightly linked to the national economy, and as a result, our state's prosperity, the prosperity of our citizen depends in no small measure on the ability of all public servants in washington to come together on a path forward. uncertainty here in federal support hurts both our economies and the federal budget, and the implications are incredibly important. governors have been working with the president, the vice president, and congressional leadership to find solutions to help put our country back on firm financial footing. one of the largest elements of the uncertainty concerned elements of the fiscal cliff that were either postponed or taken out of the reason -- recent relief act of 2012 as the only postponed reducing grants to states. intimate reform was not addressed, and no action was taken regarding the federal
-ups, we are taking steps to make sure conn leads again. when it came to education, the stakes were clear. take action together or risk losing an entire generation of young people to failing schools and a widening achievement gap. i am proud that after a long and hard debate, we were able to say with one voice, that the status quo was no locker acceptable. that when it comes to public education, we cannot keep doing what we have always done and simply hope for better results. that our kids cannot afford it and our state cannot afford it as well. we work with an eye towards a future and have made an historic investment of nearly $100 million from three k to high- school, focusing on those districts that are most in need. reaching kids early is critical to the success and early childhood education had to be a central portion of our education reform. so we created 1000 new school readiness opens statewide for youngsters at a time when no one thought that it was possible. that is 1000 more children that will show up to kindergarten this fall ready to learn. we did that together, and we will d
was an administrator in north carolina and was the national alliance of black school educators superintendent of the year. we have elizabeth celania-fagen -- liz fagen, douglas county superintendent of schools. she was superintendent of tucson unified. a beacon of education reform by arne duncan. david coleman, president of the college board. he co-founded student achievement partners. he was recognized as one of 11 education act of this. he was new school change agent of the year. he has set a high bar. always a mistake. john deasy, los angeles unified superintendent of schools, second largest system in the country. he was deputy director of education for the bill and melinda gates foundation. he is remembered as the hard- charging superintendent of the prince george's county schools. we have joanne weiss, chief of duncan. army duncane she ran the race to the top program, getting that off to a widely heralded start. ceo at the new schools venture fund. let's get this started. lost angeles is wrestling with a number of challenges. there are concerns about the reform. of where does it intersec
mentioned. perhaps better voter education about the tools that are out there to help them know where they need to vote, more staffing at the polling places where a captain or assistant captain could actually go through the front lines, the czech and lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone -- checkin lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone got any questions? i can check for you. that has become a real issue with all of the precincts. so come up voter education might be part of it, and i think early voting has law lot of voters into thinking "i can vote anywhere." and the only races they care about will be counted and in some cases the lower level races, they may be upset about. but it is like a shrug it for them and they say, oh, well. i think some of the lower races, some of the ballot initiatives, the more localized issues -- there might be a real problem in the end. so. >> thank you. i have a few things that have been touched on by almost everybody here. just to the voters, about being prepared. i know in arlington county, you can go on the web site. it tells
and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some -- danger awesome in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm giving their introductions in the order there will speak. ey will speak. he is a professor at the mit department of urban studies. he is an urban planner and political scientist. -- the deputy manager of the new york housing authority. he is a frequent adviser to trade unions and their efforts to work with immigrants and community groups across the united states. he is the author of a double trouble, black mayors, black communities, and the struggle for democracy. if he is writing a book on community building and development since the 1960's. finally, chris was awarded a pulitzer prize in 2002
our beaches. the department of education has worked night and day to give schools -- to get schools reopened as quickly as possible, and where not possible, to get them restored by the next school year, while maintaining our commitment to full 180-day school year of education for all of new jersey's children. executive order one of the seven says when interest payments, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles, and will ensure citizens maximize their reimbursements from companies. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the merkel of route 45 in manalocee. the bridge had been completely washed away. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flow into the bay, and once carried thousands of cars of days to vacationers down the shore. within days, the commissioner, the department of transportation, and our private sector partners and had a temporary road built to allow mercy vehicles onto the island. now nearly 10 weeks after the storm, you see a permanent route 35 already been re
education but she just imbued in me this notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? just tell you that every day or how do you feel she made -- >> well, she had very high expectations, and let me know that she expected me to do well in school. but when i would talk to her about, i might work in the white house some day or i'm interested in politics or bag lawyer, she never said -- she said, you'll have to study hard and make good grades because you'll need to get a scholarship because i won't be able to afford it. but she never said, -- the sky's the limit was her view. so i did go to law school, and in the early '80s, when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice, and was going around to law firms, and even at that it point there weren't that many women in the law firm and i had guys who interviewed me sit me down and say, you understand, if you come to the firm you have to try cases, you have to go to court. i said i'm excited about it. and then i had clients who in the beginning would -- i'd go in to meet with them and afterwards one of my pa
there are barriers for women to move into these corporals or into these law firms? do we have an education system supporting women in this process? it comes down to how we are supporting the family structure. that is often what it comes down to. and that is a question for more and more men today. you think about men who are on the part of track and women who are on this mommy track. -- men who are on this partner track and women who are on this mommy track. i know more and more men who want to go coach soccer at night. host: there is a story in psychology today in january talk about women voting and the psychology behind it. part of the information was the data behind the pilot test. guest: it is tough. we just did some research this post-election. there has always been a sense that women will vote for women. women will vote for women if they really see that woman in a way that she is accomplished, viable, and have the same belief system. it is more likely women will vote for democrats first. and there is an 18-point gender gap in the presidential alexian. and it went to president obama. -- in th
of education and specialization, those tend to be going begging. there are opportunities there. it takes a lot of schooling an effort to get yourself where you're in position to take those jobs. -- and effort to get yourself where you're in a position to take those jobs. if you want to be a waitress, you can probably find a job. if you want to be a brain surgeon, you can probably find a job. if you want to be an aircraft mechanic making $38 an hour, that can be a lot tougher. there is one thing that is helping with that, this energy resurgence. we're seeing an awful lot of energy jobs being created because of this process the people referred to as a fracking. and conventional means of extracting oil and gas. -- unconvential means of extracting oil and gas. another area that is doing pretty well is spinoffs from agriculture. if we have a somewhat normal year in terms of whetheather ths agricultureverage purchase o sector. there are some points of hope within that structure is generally true that the low- paying jobs -- structure. it is generally true that low- paying jobs and high-paying jobs a
paid more, but they thought it was too much of a headache. there is much to be done to educate the older generation of publishers to understand that they will have to engage on every level with their audiences in the next phase. >> my name is jeff roberts, former broadcast journalist. winston churchill famously said democracy is the worst possible form of government. i am curious what country you think might be doing a better job in disseminating news through the mass media where it is not as hysterical, not as pointed as our news coverage is. does anybody do it better, or is this just the way it is in free society? i hope you don't say great britain. >> i think this is the way it is. if you go to europe, you will find that they did not seem to go through this golden age. the big newspapers there are not owned by parties, they are affiliated with parties in their ideology. the editorial page and the news pages will work together to report stories, where you are we have this great fire wall between the editorial pages and the news pages. i do think this is the worst possible med
for the post-9/11 gi bill. his helping today's returning heroes get their education. he knows our armed forces collect and depend on good intelligence. he recognizes american leadership is indispensable in a dangerous world. i saw this in our travels together across the middle east. he understands america stands strongest when we stand with allies. as a successful businessman, he also knows we have to make tough fiscal choices wisely guided by strategy and keep our military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. maybe most importantly, he understands sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt is something we only do when absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared toward the guy at the bottom doing the fighting and dying. with chuck, our troops will always know secretary hagel will be there for you. finally, he represents the bipartisanship we need more of in washington. he has earned the respect of national security and military leaders, republicans and democrats, including me. in the senate, i came to admire his courage and judgment, his wi
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)